Ypsi-area residents create website, grassroots organization to encourage civic engagement

Noble Horvath

When Ypsilanti resident and community activist Gail Summerhill hears a politician tell constituents, “Register and go vote,” she says it makes her feel like cussing.

 

“It’s like a knife every time I hear it. All you ever hear is ‘register and go vote,’ but you’re assuming that a person’s life is like yours when you make that statement,” she says. “It’s like saying to someone, ‘Take the keys to my car and go to Kroger and get a loaf of bread and bring it back.’ And you find out it’s a stick shift and you’ve never driven a stick shift.”

 

Empowering Ypsilanti-area residents with the building blocks of civic education is the goal behind the grassroots organization and website Summerhill and a team of friends created: Ypsi, Can I Share?

 

The website “is filling a communication gap most people and groups involved in community activism and politics ignore,” says Ypsi,

Read More

PCGS Embeds NFC Technology in Coin and Bank Note Holders

Noble Horvath

 

PCGS-graded coin and banknote holders now feature an NFC symbol on the obverse of the label. Coin holders also feature this symbol on the front bottom left of the holder. (Image courtesy of Professional Coin Grading Service)

Professional Coin Grading Service will begin embedding Near Field Communication (NFC) technology in all its encapsulated coins, medals, tokens, and banknotes in October 2020, the company announced in an Oct. 1 press release. This revolutionary advancement launches after an initial limited rollout earlier this year with coins graded in PCGS Gold Shield holders to test compatibility and user response, both of which were overwhelmingly positive.

“PCGS is the industry leader in fighting counterfeiting,” says PCGS President Brett Charville. “PCGS has always been ahead of the curve in the numismatic industry regarding technology, and the inclusion of NFC technology is just the latest way we can stay one step ahead of counterfeiters and ensure

Read More

10 things you should never do on a work computer

Noble Horvath

Work computers are for one thing: Work. And anything outside of work could jeopardize your career.

While you might assume that clearing the history log in your computer is enough to get rid of any evidence that you’ve been shopping, tweeting or searching for new jobs, IT departments are still able to monitor computer use.

“Any personal data or behavior done on any work device can and is collected by your employer,” management expert Andrew Wittman told the Business Insider. “Be mindful of every search, click and email sent, as well as any personal data or behavior, including searches, shopping, social media, emails and websites visited.”

To help you be mindful, we’ve curated this list of 10 things you should never do on your work computer.

1. DON’T: Save personal passwords.

According to the Society of Human Resource Management, many companies have a clause in their computer, email and internet

Read More

Good journalism is not always enough, it must also be accessible | DW Freedom | Speech. Expression. Media. | DW

Noble Horvath

When only the state television program is broadcast, when there are no more oppositional newspapers and demonstrators are forced off the streets – then the Internet remains. It offers access to free information. Dissenters can express themselves in blogs and social media without restrictions, and foreign information providers like DW provide fact-based news. The underlying journalistic values are based on an open and diverse world view.

People have been deprived of this right by their governments, especially in times of crisis, when the need for objective information is particularly great.

The most recent example is Belarus. More than 70 websites in the country were blocked following protests after the presidential elections in August.

In Kashmir, people had to go 213 days without internet, in China and Iran many international websites have been blocked for many years. Among them are the websites of DW and the BBC.

DW seeks to provide

Read More

‘Call of Duty: Modern Warfare’ multiplayer is free this weekend

Noble Horvath

Smitten by Call of Duty: Warzone, but not sure if the rebooted Modern Warfare is worth the price of admission? Good news: for three days, the multiplayer portion of Infinity Ward’s latest shooter is going free-to-play. Download Warzone (if you haven’t already) and Modern Warfare‘s multiplayer offerings will unlock at roughly 1PM ET/10AM PT/7PM CET on April 3rd. To celebrate this so-called “multiplayer moshpit,” Infinity Ward has developed a special playlist called Stocked Up, Locked Down that cycles through two maps, Atlas Superstore and Shoot House, and a range of modes including Team Deathmatch, Domination and Hardpoint.

The free multiplayer access will expire on April 6th at 1PM ET/10AM PT/7PM CET. It’s a nice gesture, and one that Activision no doubt hopes will persuade more people to buy Modern Warfare. Unlike Blackout, which required Call of Duty: Black Ops 4, Warzone is completely free-to-play. That

Read More