Technology Addiction | Hazelden Betty Ford

Technology is everywhere, and it is not going away. Teenagers stare down at their iPhones, or keep their eyes glued to a tablet or laptop, instead of observing the world around them. It’s not unusual to see two adolescents seated together on a bus, texting furiously on their mobiles rather than talking to one another. The fact that teens are so dependent on technology makes sense in our world, but it may also lead to negative consequences.

What is technology addiction?

Technology addiction can be defined as frequent and obsessive technology-related behavior increasingly practiced despite negative consequences to the user of the technology. An over-dependence on tech can significantly impact students’ lives. While we need technology to survive in a modern social world, a severe overreliance on technology—or an addiction to certain facets of its use—can also be socially devastating. Tech dependence can lead to teen consequences that span from

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NetAddiction | Internet Addiction Test (IAT)

The Internet Addiction Test emerged as the first validated measure of Internet and technology addiction. The Internet Addiction suite of tests brings together the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Internet Addiction Test for Families (IAT-F). The IAT is a self-report instrument for adolescents and adults. The IAT-F is for children and adolescents and completed by an informant who knows the youth well. Both instruments can be used together in assessment to obtain a well-rounded profile of the client’s Internet addiction and also to identify discrepancies amongst raters, who could benefit from psychoeducation.

To learn more about the validation studies of the Internet Addiction Test and for order information, please click here:

The assessments can be administered in a variety of mental health settings, including private practice clinics, schools, hospitals and residential programs. They can be used when there is suspicion of Internet addiction, as part of a broad intake

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Internet Addiction Guide | Psych Central

Researchers still can’t tell you exactly what Internet Addiction Disorder is, also know by the term “Pathological Internet Use” (PIU). Much of the original research was based upon the weakest type of research methodology, namely exploratory surveys with no clear hypothesis, agreed-upon definition of the term, or theoretical conceptualization. Coming from an atheoretical approach has some benefits, but also is not typically recognized as being a strong way to approach a new disorder. More recent research has expanded upon the original surveys and anecdotal case study reports. However, as I will illustrate below later, even these studies don’t support the conclusions the authors claim.

The original research into this disorder began with exploratory surveys, which cannot establish causal relationships between specific behaviors and their cause. While surveys can help establish descriptions of how people feel about themselves and their behaviors, they cannot draw conclusions about whether a specific technology, such … Read More

Computer Addiction Services

Computer Addiction Services

McLean Hospital
115 Mill Street
Belmont, MA 02478

 

10 Langley Road
Suite 200
Newton Centre, MA 02459

 


Photo by Kris Snibbe

Phone: 617-855-2908

Email: Orzack@ComputerAddiction.com


FOR OVER 15 YEARS Dr. Orzack, a licensed clinical psychologist,
has treated addictive behaviors at
McLean Hospital,
where she is founder and coordinator of the

Computer Addiction Service
and a member of the Harvard Medical
School
faculty. She is also a faculty member of the Cognitive Therapy Program, and in
private practice in Newton Centre, Massachusetts. In addition she has studied recreational
drug use and thinks that inappropriate computer use is similar. Her sense is that we are
just seeing the tip of the iceberg. Our society is becoming more and more computer
dependent not only for information, but for fun and entertainment. This trend is a
potential problem affecting all ages, starting with computer games for kids to chats for
the

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Technology Addiction | Internet Addiction

Technology addiction — sometimes called Internet addiction, Internet use disorder (IUD) or Internet addiction disorder (IAD) — is a fairly new phenomenon. It’s often described as a serious problem involving the inability to control use of various kinds of technology, in particular the Internet, smartphones, tablets and social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Now that it’s effortless to text and access the Web and social media from almost anywhere, more of us are dependent on communicating via the tiny computers we carry with us. So it’s no surprise that health experts are seeing a rise in addictive tendencies that involve technology. (Technology includes, of course, video games, cybersex/online pornography and online gambling, and these addictions are explored in more depth in other sections on Addiction.com.)

Technology addiction, and the related and more common term Internet addiction disorder, aren’t recognized as addictions or disorders in the latest edition of

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Gadget Addiction

by Ananth Indrakanti, Milan Chutake, Stephen Prouty, Venkat Sundaranatha, Vinod Koverkathu

Introduction

Technology and gadgets are now indispensable in our daily lives. In the past few years carrying a miniature computer (a smart phone) in a pocket has become commonplace. Technology helps advance the human race forward and makes doing mundane things more efficient and repeatable. Technology has helped create the information revolution.

With technological advances, devices have evolved to be so powerful and smart that it feels like having a super-computer on one’s hands. Humans now have an insatiable appetite for information at their fingertips. When technology makes this happen, the natural tendency is for this to become an expectation. When was the last time you printed a map or wrote a snail mail letter? If you did, then you belong to the elite endangered cadre of humans who are vanishing rapidly. Welcome to the information age! Before we

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