Tag: Facts

Internet Statistics & Facts (Including Mobile) for 2020

Internet Stats & Facts for 2020

The Internet changes so much from year to year that the facts and stats from one year often look completely different the next.

Rather than leave you with old or irrelevant data to reference and share, we regularly revisit and revise our list of Internet statistics.

In the following Internet Stats & Facts for 2020, we’ve rounded up all the important data related to:

Internet Statistics 2020

1. There are 7.77 billion people in the world. (Worldometer), 4.54 billion of them are active Internet users. (Statista)

2. Asia has the largest percentage of Internet users by continent/region (Internet World Stats):

  • 50.3% are in Asia
  • 15.9% are in Europe
  • 11.5% are in Africa
  • 10.1% are in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • 7.6% are in North America
  • 3.9% are in the Middle East
  • 0.6% are in Oceania and Australia

Percentage of Internet users by continent/region.

3. Kuwait is the country with

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Internet Explorer | Browser, Downloads, & Facts

Internet Explorer (IE), World Wide Web (WWW) browser and set of technologies created by Microsoft Corporation, a leading American computer software company. After being launched in 1995, Internet Explorer became one of the most popular tools for accessing the Internet. There were 11 versions between 1995 and 2013.

In July 1995 Microsoft released Internet Explorer 1.0 as an add-on to the Windows 95 operating system. By November the company had produced IE 2.0 for both Apple Inc.’s Macintosh and Microsoft’s Windows 32-bit operating systems. This release featured support for the virtual reality modeling language (VRML), browser “cookies” (data saved by Web sites within the user’s browser), and secure socket layering (SSL). The success of IE and the rapidly expanding online world led Microsoft to produce several editions of the program in rapid succession. In August 1996 IE 3.0, designed for use with Windows 95, added important components such

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computer | History, Networking, Operating Systems, & Facts

Computer, device for processing, storing, and displaying information.

Computer once meant a person who did computations, but now the term almost universally refers to automated electronic machinery. The first section of this article focuses on modern digital electronic computers and their design, constituent parts, and applications. The second section covers the history of computing. For details on computer architecture, software, and theory, see computer science.

Computing basics

The first computers were used primarily for numerical calculations. However, as any information can be numerically encoded, people soon realized that computers are capable of general-purpose information processing. Their capacity to handle large amounts of data has extended the range and accuracy of weather forecasting. Their speed has allowed them to make decisions about routing telephone connections through a network and to control mechanical systems such as automobiles, nuclear reactors, and robotic surgical tools. They are also

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history of technology | Summary & Facts

History of technology, the development over time of systematic techniques for making and doing things. The term technology, a combination of the Greek technē, “art, craft,” with logos, “word, speech,” meant in Greece a discourse on the arts, both fine and applied. When it first appeared in English in the 17th century, it was used to mean a discussion of the applied arts only, and gradually these “arts” themselves came to be the object of the designation. By the early 20th century, the term embraced a growing range of means, processes, and ideas in addition to tools and machines. By mid-century, technology was defined by such phrases as “the means or activity by which man seeks to change or manipulate his environment.” Even such broad definitions have been criticized by observers who point out the increasing difficulty of distinguishing between scientific inquiry and technological activity.

A

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